Vegetarian

Great Bread Without the Work

By Sofie Sherman-Burton, Marketing & Membership Manager

This recipe isn’t a secret. When The New York Times published now famed baker Jim Lahey’s no-knead bread for the first time over ten years ago, it quickly became the most popular recipe that the newspaper ever published.

There is good reason for this, which you’ll soon find out if you give this a shot (and, really, there is no reason not to if you haven’t already – unless, you know, you don’t eat bread). This recipe is dead simple. The ingredients are basic and super inexpensive. It doesn’t require any special tools. But the results are really very good: that crispy crust that can be hard to get baking at home, a nice texture the will sop up sauce or soup or olive oil, a decentsized loaf, a gentle tang from plenty of fermentation time.

It is also ripe for experimentation. Maybe you want to mix in some different kinds of flours – whole wheat, spelt, rye, some oat. Or add some herbs or spices – rosemary, caraway. Throw in some seeds or nuts, toss in some smashed garlic cloves or olives, mix in some cinnamon and raisins. The bulk section is really your playground, here.

We’ll offer two departing places: an all whole-wheat sandwich loaf and the classic recipe (if you want to add in some whole wheat flavor, start with swapping a third of the all purpose flour for another flour of your choice). From there, get experimenting!

Recipes adapted very slightly from The New York Times.

loaf3.jpg

No Knead Bread

  • 3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting
  • ¼ teaspoon instant yeast (just give a little more time for the active dry yeast!)
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons salt
  • Water
  • Cornmeal, or wheat bran as needed

In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water and stir with your fingers until the dough is combined and there is no more dry flour; it will be shaggy and sticky. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature (around 70°F).

The dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) or parchment paper with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side (where the folds are) down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, the dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

At least 30 minutes before the dough is ready, heat your oven to 450°F. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex, or ceramic) in the oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under the towel and turn the dough over into the pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove the lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until the loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack. Slice into it and enjoy!

No Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup whole rye flour
  • ½ cup coarse cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • Oil as needed

Combine flours, cornmeal, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add 1 1/2 cups water and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest about 4 hours at a warm room temperature, around 70 degrees.

Oil a standard loaf pan (8 or 9 inches by 4 inches; nonstick works well). Lightly oil your hands and shape dough into a rough rectangle. Put it in pan, pressing it out to the edges. Brush top with a little more oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 1 hour more.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Bake bread about 45 minutes, or until loaf reaches an internal temperature of 210°. Remove the bread from the pan and cool on a rack.

Notes

Want to mix it up, but don’t know where to start? Variations on this recipe are all over the internet. Give it a Google. Some of my favorite variation guides, of sorts, are from The Kitchn and Green Kitchen Stories.

When I made the no-knead bread with 1/3 spelt flour, my dough was super wet and hard to form after 18 hours! I did my best and threw it in the pot, and it turned our pretty great. The results are pictured!

Homemade Condiments for the BBQ & Beyond

By Sofie Sherman-Burton, Marketing & Membership Manager

Cooking (and eating) outside is one of my favorite parts of warmer weather. On the first warm days of spring, you’ll usually find me texting friends to see who’s free right now and running to the store for a bag of briquettes. Hanging out while the grill heats up, throwing an odd assortment of things on the grill and then onto a plate, and getting a whiff of the lingering smell of smoke in my hair are all quintessential summer moments that I think back to with potent jealousy in January. I also really love condiments and making my own. A few jars of sauces or toppings in the fridge can turn some wonderful (but maybe boring) grilled vegetables into something transcendent. These are all also pretty cheap, pretty easy, and adaptable for uses away from the grill.

Cider Mayonnaise

The first time we made this, my partner declared it “the sharp cheddar of mayo.” That’s not so far from the truth: the apple cider vinegar adds an extra tang that makes this mayo kind of special. I like dipping all kinds of things in it (veggies, potatoes) and of course slathering it on buns.

Ingredients

  • 1 large egg yolk
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 ½ cups neutral oil (like canola)

In a food processor, blend the egg yolk, salt, mustard, and vinegar. With the motor running, slowly drizzle in the oil until the mixture is thick, emulsified, and looks like mayo! Store in the refrigerator in a lidded container for up to 7 days. Makes about 1 ½ cups. You could also try making this by hand with a whick or in a blender. Recipe from Poole’s: Recipes and Stories from a Modern Diner by Ashley Christensen.

DSC_7288.jpg

Basic Country Mustard

There are so many ways to customize this mustard and make it your: brown mustard seeds are spicier than white ones, you can try a variety of vinegars (start with apple cider or white wine), sweeten it, add your favorite herb (like thyme, oregano, or rosemary). No matter what route you take, mustard is super easy to make and just takes a little time!

Ingredients

  • Ingredients
  • 6 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • ½ cup mustard powder
  • ½ cup water or beer
  • 3 tablespoons of vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons honey or agave (optional)
  • ¼ cup minced herbs (optional)

Grind the mustard seeds for a few seconds in an electric grinder, or use a mortar and pestle. They should be mostly whole, but crushed. Pour those seeds into a bowl and add the salt and mustard powder. Add your turmeric, sweetener, or herbs here, too, if you’re using them. Pour in the water or beer and stir well. When everything is incorporated, let the mixture sit for ten minutes (the longer you let it sit, the mellower it will be). When you’re ready, pour in the vinegar. Put your mustard in a glass jar with a lid and store it in the fridge. It will be a bit runny, but should thicken over night. Wait at least 12 hours before using. You should end up with about a half a cup of mustard , which will keep for up to a year in the fridge. Adapted slightly from honest-food.net.

Pickled Red Onions

When I have a jar of pickled red onions in the fridge, I put them on just about everything. They’re perfect on tacos, grilled cheese, and pizza, but also on salads, soup, grilled veggies, or atop a rice bowl. They add a great vinegar-y crunch but their pretty pink color might be reason enough for my enthusiasm. This method, which doesn’t even require turning on the stove, is a perfect place to start. If you want to get more creative, bring the sugar, salt, vinegar, and water to a boil on the stove with your desired spices: try fennel, mustard seeds, coriander seeds, peppercorns, allspice berries, sprigs of rosemary or thyme or oregano, dried chili….

Ingredients

  • 1 red onion, sliced into half moons as thin as you can manage
  • 1 garlic clove sliced thinly or just thoroughly smashed
  • 2 teaspoons sugar (you could use honey or agave instead)
  • 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
  • ½ cup white vinegar (or use white wine vinegar)
  • ½ cup water

Put everything in a pint jar (or a bigger one if you had a big onion!), screw on the lid tightly, and shake the jar until the salt and sugar have dissolved. If you see granules on the bottom, keep shaking. Let the jar sit out at room temperature for 20 minutes or so. You can eat them right away, or pop them in the fridge. They’ll keep for up to two weeks. Recipe from Small Victories by Julia Turshen.

One Pot Pasta with Whatever is on Hand

by Caitlin Gaylord Churchill, Perishable & Dairy Buyer and Co-Manager

I love this dish because it’s so easy. For it to be a meal, I reason, there should be at least a half hour of me throwing vegetable peels on the floor and in my hair while I braise and nearly burn something else. It doesn’t have to be that way, but I feel most comfortable with a little chaos around me – it’s hard for me to embrace the easy. So put your long hair up with two pencils or a rubber band and listen up:

You can edit this dish in many ways to fit what you have around and what you like. The basic idea is that you get a salty pot of water boiling, add the pasta and when there is 3-4 minutes left in the pasta’s cooking cycle, add some veggies that will cook also. If you’re adding a frozen veg, defrost it in the colander with a water rinse before adding to the pot. Veggies like broccoli could take longer or be cut smaller, your choice. Veggies such as fresh chard or spinach could be put in with a minute to spare so they don’t overcook.

Ingredients

  • 200 grams legume-based pasta
  • 1 pound of fresh green beans
  • 2 cups frozen shelled green peas
  • Sea salt for cooking water and garnish
  • 4 tablespoons cold-pressed olive oil
  • Zest and juice of 1 organic lemon
  • 4 tablespoons capers
  • A large handful fresh mint, leaves only

Instructions

Put a large pot of water on the stove and heat over a high flame.

While the water is heating up, wash, trim, and chop the beans. Shell the peas (or take them out of the fridge or freezer). Wash and roughly chop the mint. Once the cooking water is boiling, salt it generously (it should taste salty).

Add the pasta and set a timer for about three minutes before the suggested cooking time. Three minutes before the pasta is done, add the beans and peas. Cook for three minutes. Drain well and place back in the pot. Add the olive oil (important to keep the pasta from sticking!), lemon zest, drained capers and a few pinches of sea salt. Season to taste. Fold in the fresh mint and serve.

Vegetable Ideas

  • Diced carrot
  • Diced summer squash (seriously, lets use ‘em up)
  • Green beans
  • Frozen peas (FAVORITE)
  • Broccoli florets
  • Cauliflower florets
  • Edamame
  • Frozen or fresh spinach
  • Chard leaves

Seasoning

  • Sundried tomatoes, garlic, & basil
  • Coconut milk, curry, & peanuts
  • Tahini dressing, made with tahini, lemon, garlic, & water in the food processor

Beets, Buckwheat, & Chevre

By Caitlin Gaylord Churchill, Perishable & Dairy Buyer and Comanager

Originally this was a recipe for roasted beets and farro, which I found on the illustrious FoodNetwork.com. I don’t find farro to be that interesting of a grain, so this is the jazzed up version. It takes a little longer to prepare, but I find that it’s more interesting. You can leave out the cheese entirely and it’s still delish.

Ingredients

  • 1½ pounds small beets (I like to mix red and yellow)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea Salt and Black Pepper
  • 5 sprigs thyme
  • 2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
  • ½ cup shelled raw pistachios
  • ½ cup pitted prunes, diced
  • 4 tablespoons salted butter or earth balance
  • 1½ cups buckwheat kasha
  • 3 cups of vegetable stock
  • 4 ounces chevre or Heidi Ho vegan goat cheese

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 425°F.

Cut beets into halves. Combine the beets, olive oil, 1 teaspoon of salt, some pepper, the thyme sprigs, and the garlic cloves on a baking sheet. Cover with foil and roast for 30 to 35 minutes, until easily pierced with a paring knife. During that time on another rack in the oven, roast the pistachios for 5 minutes. Set aside both to cool completely.

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan or deep saute pan over medium heat. Add the buckwheat and stir until coated with butter and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Stir in the prunes and add 3 cups of stock. Bring to a boil, cover, and let simmer on low for 25 minutes. With a paper towel, remove the skins from the beets. Quarter the beets and add them to the bowl with the cooked buckwheat. Fold in the toasted pistachios.

Squeeze the roasted garlic into a small bowl. Mash it with a fork and season with salt and pepper, and then stir it into the salad. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss gently to combine. Top with the crumbled goat cheese.

Angelica's Kitchen Potato Leek Soup with Greens

By Caitlin Gaylord Churchill, Perishable & Dairy Buyer and Comanager

When I was in my late teens and early twenties I would sometimes go into The City (you know, New York) for a weekend with friends. I had very little money, but what money I had I hoarded and then spent exclusively on restaurant food. I would walk all over and eat samosas in a basement level quicky mart with cab drivers on the lower east side, and then oysters at the cavernous Oyster Bar in Grand Central Station. One place that was frequently on the list to visit was Angelica’s Kitchen – one of the first hip vegetarian restaurants ever. Gluten Free Corn Bread – they had it before it was cool. This potato leek soup is like a free trip to that restaurant. It’s familiar and comforting but somehow also bright and healthy. It comes out a lovely green once it’s pureed. The only next level cooking tool you might need is an immersion blender – you could use a regular food processor but it would take a lot of ladling hot soup back and forth – not my favorite way to pass the time.

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup and 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 large leeks, whites only
  • 6 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 4-5 cups of vegetable stock
  • 1 pound yukon gold potatoes diced into ½” cubes
  • 2 bunches of spinach or watercress, washed, drained and coarsely chopped (frozen is fine if defrosted)
  • 1 tablespoon tarragon, leaves only
  • Juice of 1 lemon, fresh

Instructions

Combine the ¼ cup oil, leeks and whole garlic cloves in a heavybottomed pot or deep sauce pan over medium heat. Cover and simmer for 3 minutes.

Add pinch of salt, lower the heat, cover and cook 15 minutes longer, stirring occasionally.

Add the potatoes and enough stock to cover them, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until potatoes are tender, about 20 to 25 minutes.

Add the spinach or watercress to the soup and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes longer. Add tarragon and remaining olive oil, and then blend the soup until creamy with an immersion blender, or in a blender or food processor. Stir in lemon juice, season with salt and pepper to taste.

If the soup is too thick, thin with additional stock to desired consistency.

Best polenta, mushrooms & kale

Field of red leaves.JPG

A quick supper for an autumn weeknight, celebrating some staples of the Northwest. 

Ingredients

  • About a cup of cremini mushrooms 
  • Butter (or substitute olive oil)
  • Olive or canola oil 
  • 1 cup polenta (maybe some special kind, grown near you, with no GMOs! Like the kind sold at People’s Food Co-op in bulk!) 
  • Salt 
  • Kale, just a few leaves 
  • About 1 cup of oyster or other more unusual mushrooms 
  • Black pepper
  • Mustard
  • Beer or wine (optional) 

Slice the cremini mushrooms. Put butter and a small drizzle of oil in a cast iron pan, raise the heat to high and add the mushrooms. Stir to coat, reduce the heat to medium and cook without crowding until they start to color on one side. Flip them with a spatula and cook until colored on the other side. Towards the end, turn the heat back up to high and press down on them with your spatula. The remaining water should sputter out and evaporate, and the edges should crisp just perfectly. Swiftly remove and set aside. 

Cook the polenta in a heavy-bottomed saucepan: mix the polenta with 4 cups of water, 1 teaspoon salt and olive oil, bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, stir. When it first starts to really thicken, add the cremini mushrooms and a knob of butter. When it starts to thicken dramatically, reduce the heat to as low as it’ll go and stir in another pat of butter. De-stem the kale leaves and cut them into ribbons. Stir them in, cover the pot and turn off the heat. Let the polenta rest so that the kale can steam. 

Mushrooms, good polenta.JPG

In the mushroom pan, add more butter and oil. Cook the fancier mushrooms in pulled-apart pieces on medium-high heat. Add a drop of mustard, maybe a splash of beer or wine if you are drinking any. Add some salt and a heavy cracking of black pepper. 

Serve the polenta with kale ribbons in a bowl, topped with the fancier mushrooms and a dusting of flaky salt. 

Extra ideas

This kind of dinner can also be made with delicious polenta triangles. This is an adaptation of “Erico’s Easy Polenta,” on the back of the Golden Pheasant bag. 

Ingredients

  • 3 1⁄4 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup polenta
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for frying
  • 1 tablespoon butter, plus more for the dish (or use olive oil)

Butter a ceramic baking dish. Pour in the water. Stir in the salt to dissolve it. Add the polenta and olive oil, stirring to distribute the oil and avoid clumping. Bake at 350 degrees F, uncovered, for 50 minutes. Run a fork through it, spread melted butter over the top with a rubber spatula, and bake for 10 more minutes. Let cool, then cut into triangles. Fry up in oil, and top with mushrooms and kale or other delicious things. Roasted squash, roasted garlic, roasted cauliflower?  Chickpea curry? Ratatouille? 

Celeriac, Fennel & Orange Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 celeriac
  • 1 fennel bulb
  • 3 blood oranges
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 large navel or cara cara orange
  • olive oil
  • almonds (handful)
  • tarragon white wine vinegar

Prepare a big bowl with cold water. Drop in some lemon juice from a bottle or a fruit. 

Peel the celeriac. Drop into the lemon bath immediately. 

Trim the fennel (reserving the tops with fronds) and slice into thin boomerangs. Move them to the lemon bath. Take out the celeriac, cut it in half, put the other half back. Keep cutting the celeriac now into thin-to-medium matchsticks. Moving the finished ones to the lemon bath, then repeating with the second half of the vegetable. 

Cut the oranges into 1/4 inch rounds. Trim the peels with a paring knife. Cut little triangular pieces, removing center seeds or any remaining pith, so you have clean and beautiful jewels of citrus. 

Drain the lemon bath, add more lemon juice, a splash of tarragon white wine vinegar, and olive oil. Toss to dress. 

Chop the handful of almonds roughly, just making sure some pieces are quite small. 

Assemble each serving separately. Take the celeriac and fennel pieces, make a nice pile, add pieces of orange, toss over some almonds, drizzle over some good finishing-olive oil, crack on black pepper, toss on some finishing salt, then tear fennel fronds over the whole thing. 

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo credits Peter Schweitzer.

Rutabaga Fries with Paprika & Caraway Ketchup

Ingredients

  • About one medium rutabaga per person
  • Oil, enough to cover an inch of a pot or pan
  • Salt
  • Paprika 
  • Ketchup
  • A tablespoon or two of caraway seeds

Peel and trim the rutabaga. Lob off the bottoms first, so they have sturdy footing as you trim around the edges. Cut into 1/4 inch disks, then further into your desired fry-shape. 

Heat the oil in a particularly heat conductive pan; a copper bottom Revereware pan is great for this. 

In a separate, dry pan, toast plenty (a teaspoon or two) of caraway seeds over medium heat. When they are fragrant, take them off the heat and tip into a mortar or onto a cutting board. Smash or chop them up, then stir into your preferred store bought ketchup. 

When the oil is quite hot for the frying, add the pieces of rutabaga a few at a time.

Using tongs to turn the pieces and remove them, use your own judgement/preference for deepening color and crispness. Remove to a baking sheet lined with paper towels to drain onto. Hold in an oven set to 200º until all the fries are done. Remove the paper towel, blotting once more.

Sprinkle on paprika and salt. Place until the broiler until starting to crisp. Turn over the pieces, repeat. Or simply roast in the oven for 5-10 minutes, turned up to 400º. When the fries have been re-crisped and the paprika is going dark, take them out, toss on a little more paprika and salt, then eat immediately with the caraway ketchup.

 

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo credits Peter Schweitzer.

Candied Carrots with Herbs & White Pepper Sour Cream

Ingredients

  • Carrots (good looking, smallish)
  • Sugar (or honey, agave, or maple syrup if you prefer)
  • Salt
  • Oil
  • Lots of herbs: mint, winter savory, rosemary, sage, oregano, parsley, or whatever you can get your hands on

For the white pepper sour cream (optional)

  • Sour cream (plain yogurt would work well, too)
  • White pepper
Candied carrots copy.jpg

Trim the tops of the carrots and slice in half them lengthwise, all the way to the tip. Cook in boiling, salted water for about 3 minutes, until just tender. Remove to an ice bath, change the water after a minute or two. Drain when the carrots are cooled. 

In a bowl, dress the carrots with oil and a few pinches of both sugar and salt. Heat a flat, wide seasoned pan over medium-high heat. Place the carrots in the pan, cut side down. Let cook until those cut sides are starting to candy, but before any part burns. This involves very careful watching, and a lot of picking up carrots with tongs. I find this sort of thing fun, though– perhaps you do too?

Meanwhile, chop your heaping pile of herbs. 

Remove to a baking dish and place in a 300º oven (or transfer your oven-safe pan to the oven), where they will stay warm and continue to candy a bit. When all the carrots are in the baking dish, toss them with the herbs. 

When ready to serve, make up a dish of spicy sour cream. Take a few tablespoons in a bowl, add a drizzle of cold water, stir till smooth and just a bit thinner than usual. Add a full 1/4 teaspoon of white pepper, stir again, and serve. 

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo credits Peter Schweitzer.

Buckwheat Ginger Molasses Granola Clusters

Makes about 5 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1 ½ cups raw buckwheat groats
  • 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds
  • ½ cup raisins, currants, or other dried fruit
  • ¾ cup shredded unsweetened coconut
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp ground cardamom
  • ¼ tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • ½ cup blackstrap molasses
  • ¼ cup maple syrup or honey
  • ½ cup coconut oil, melted
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 275 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, add the oats, buckwheat, pumpkin seeds, raisins, coconut, cinnamon, cardamom, and salt. Mix to combine.

In a medium bowl, combine the molasses, maple syrup or honey, coconut oil, tahini, vanilla, and ginger. Whisk until it all comes together into a uniform liquid.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir to until everything is mixed well together and evenly distributed. Bake in the oven for about 30-45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. Granola is done when buckwheat and pumpkin seeds are slightly toasted brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely. Once cooled, break the granola up into clusters and store in an airtight container. 

Recipe courtesy of Natalie Bickford.

Spiced Spaetzle with Dandelion Greens and Caraway/Black Pepper Soured Cream

IngredientS

the spaetzle:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons toasted and roughly-ground caraway seeds
  • lots of cracked black pepper
  • 7 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup milk

the sauce:

  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 1/2 cups of soft white cheese, grated
  • smudge of mustard
  • salt

the greens:

  • 1 bunch dandelion greens
  • olive oil

the soured cream:

  • store-bought short tub of sour cream (or make your own—combine 1 cup cream with 1 tbsp buttermilk; leave out, covered, for 2 1/2 days. creme fraiche on the tangier side)
  • 1 tbsp toasted and roughly-ground caraway seeds
  • generous cracking of black pepper

To make the spaetzle

Start with the flour in a mixing bowl, incorporate the caraway seeds and black pepper, then make a well in the center. Crack all the eggs in a separate bowl, mix thoroughly (but don't beat heavily) with a fork, then pour into the well. Start to mix with a spatula, then pour in the milk as you go to make a smooth batter. If it seems to get too gummy or thick, thin out with a little water or more milk.  The consistency should really be rather like pancake batter.

In a third mixing bowl (your largest), get an ice bath ready to receive the cooked spaetzle. 

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Take a small scoop (less than a ladle will hold) of the batter and put it in your colander with holes big enough for batter to drop through in little dots. With a flexible spatula, push and scrape the dough over the bottom of the colander so that tiny nubbins of dough fall through and into the water. When your scoop of batter has gone through (you may have to pause once or twice to stir the pot of spaetzle so they don't stick together), after one a half to three minutes of cooking time (you will know when they are ready), remove with a spider strainer. Drop into the ice bath. Stir lightly, and let them settle. 

When all the dough has been used and you have an ice bath full of spaetzle, pass through another colander like you've finished making packaged spaghetti, discarding the ice water and getting as much moisture off the spaetzle as you can. Place into a buttered baking dish and let rest.

Make the sauce

Take a tablespoon of butter, melt it in a small saucepan, toss in 2 tablespoons of flour, whisk together, lower heat and cook till the roux starts to color slightly.  Add one cup of whole milk and whisk again to incorporate the flour/butter. Continue whisking at medium high heat until the mixture starts to thicken, then return to low. Add approximately 1 1/2 cups of soft white cheese (havarti, swedish farmer’s cheese, fontina, something like that). Stir until melted/incorporated into the sauce. Season with a little mustard and salt. 

Pour the sauce over the spaetzle, tossing to coat. Top with another cheese of your choosing in patterns over the dish. Bake at 350° until it resembles a finished dish of macaroni and cheese (approx 30-45 minutes). 

When the spaetzle is all ready to serve, wash a bunch of dandelion greens under the sink, then toss directly into a wok, large cast iron, or small soup pot.  Cook on medium-high until the color has intensified and they've wilted. Break some of them up if you like and toss with a mild oil to help them glisten and not stick together. 

In a bowl, artfully arrange the dandelion greens, add some spaetzle, throw in a bit of flaky salt (and maybe a small dollop of fine mustard), then top with a large serving of the caraway seed and black pepper soured cream. 

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo credits Peter Schweitzer.

Celeriac, fennel & orange salad

Ingredients

  • 1 celeriac
  • 1 fennel bulb
  • 3 blood oranges
  • 1 large navel or cara cara orange
  • olive oil
  • almonds, a handful
  • almond oil (if you have it)
  • white wine vinegar
  1. Prepare a big bowl with cold water. Drop in some lemon juice from a bottle or a fruit. 
  2. Peel the celeriac. Drop into the lemon bath immediately. 
  3. Trim the fennel (reserving the tops with fronds) and slice into thin boomerangs. Move them to the lemon bath. Take out the celeriac, cut it in half, put the other half back. Keep cutting the celeriac now, first into 1/4 inch discs, returning to the lemon bath each time, then into thin-to-medium matchsticks. Move the finished pieces right back to the lemon bath, then repeat with the other half.
  4. Cut the oranges into 1/4 inch rounds. Trim off the peels with a paring knife. Cut little triangular pieces, removing center seeds and any remaining pith so you have clean and beautiful jewels of citrus. 
  5. Drain the lemon bath, add more lemon juice, a splash of white wine vinegar and almond (or olive) oil. Toss to dress. 
  6. Chop the handful of almonds roughly, just making sure some pieces are quite small. 
  7. Assemble each serving separately. Take the celeriac and fennel pieces, make a nice pile, add pieces of orange, sprinkle with some almonds and drizzle with some good olive oil. Crack on black pepper, toss on some finishing salt, then tear fennel fronds over the whole thing. 

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo credits Peter Schweitzer.

Quinoa Veggie Bowl with Cheez Sauce

These bowls are very adaptable, feel free to use any grain and any combination of seasonal veggies. 

Ingredients

For the Cheez Sauce

  • ½ cup almond milk
  • ¼ cup nutritional yeast
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp tamari
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • ¼ tsp cumin (optional)

For the bowl

  • ½ cup quinoa, cooked
  • ½ cup grated carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups roughly chopped kale, steamed
  • 1 avocado, thinly sliced
  • handful of cilantro, roughly chopped
  • ½ cup roasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped

 

For the cheez sauce, add all ingredients into a small pot. Turn the heat to low and whisk the ingredients together until combined. Remove from heat and set aside.

Divide the quinoa into two bowls. Assemble the remaining ingredients on top of the quinoa and finished with a generous amount of cheez sauce. Enjoy!

Recipe courtesy of Natalie Bickford.

Squash and Red Lentil Curry

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups onion 
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons (or more) curry powder and garam masala
  • 1 large butternut squash, peeled and cubed
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 cup fresh tomato or 1, 15 oz canned tomatoes drained
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • Salt
  • Olive oil
  • 4 cups water
  • Lime wedges
  • Cilantro

Directions

Saute onion, garlic, ginger and spices in olive oil. Add squash, lentils, tomato and salt. Then add water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, stirring until the squash is tender for about 20 minutes. Stir in coconut milkand simmer until heated through, about 1 minute. Serve with lime wedges and cilantro and enjoy as this dish makes you comfy cozy.

Chewy Teff Ginger Molasses Cookies

Makes 32 small cookies.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups teff flour
  • ½ cup buckwheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground cloves
  • ½ tsp mustard powder
  • ½ cup creamy unsalted almond butter
  • ¼ cup coconut oil, melted
  • 2 tsp tamari
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp fresh grated ginger
  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • ½ cup blackstrap molasses

Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Add the teff flour, buckwheat flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves, and mustard powder to a large bowl and stir to combine. Add the butter, coconut oil, tamari, vanilla extract, ginger, maple syrup, and molasses to another bowl and stir to combine.  

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until just combined. Try not to over mix. Using a tablespoon, scoop the batter and drop onto the parchment lined baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 10-12 minutes, or until brown on the bottom. Remove from oven and place onto a cooling rack. Enjoy!

Recipe adapted from Clean Food by Terry Walters. Photo and adaptation by Natalie Bickford.

Quinoa Blood Orange Delicata Salad

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1-2 large onions, cut into long thin slices
  • ¼ cup avocado oil
  • pinch of salt
  • ½ cup quinoa, cooked
  • 1 medium delicata squash, cut into ½ inch wedges
  • 1.5 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ tsp pink Himalayan sea salt
  • 2 blood oranges, sliced into rounds
  • 1 medium avocado, sliced into 1 inch cubes
  • 2 cups spinach, roughly chopped
  • ½ cup roasted almonds, roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • fresh ground black pepper

Instructions

Heat ¼ cup of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add in the onion and a pinch of salt. Sauté until onions soften, then turn the heat down so the onions are simmering gently in the oil. Let it simmer on low for about 30-45 mins, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Onions are done when softened, golden brown, and slightly sweet.  Remove from heat and set aside. 

Preheat the oven to 425F. In a bowl, combine the squash, oil, and salt and toss to coat. Pour onto a parchment lined baking sheet and bake for about 25 minutes, flipping about half way through. Remove from oven and let cool.

In a large bowl, combine the quinoa, delicata squash, blood orange, avocado, spinach, almonds, and ¼ cup of the caramelized onions. In a small bowl, whisk together the 2 tbsp olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt, and pepper. Pour the dressing over the quinoa and toss to combine. Add salt and pepper, to taste. Serve and enjoy!

Recipe and photo courtesy of Natalie Bickford.

quinoa blood orange.JPG

Saag Aloo, Wild rice with Apricot & Tamarind, & Fry bread

A hot July: my orach (mountain spinach) was about to bolt and I'd just dug up the first new potatoes. Not knowing what to do with the tiny stray potatoes and a crop of baby leaves that had never gotten to maturity (the hot weather confused the poor, spinachy plants), I scratched my head a bit and came up with this. So it’s a Northwest ingredient, home gardener/farmer's market devotee's early summer celebration with Indian flavors.

This recipe is my basic saag recipe created when living in a large college co-op, and it can be applied easily to be just as tasty using regular spinach, larger potatoes, older onions and garlic, etc.

Time/mess saver hint: Process all of the garlic, ginger, and onion ahead of time; the night, or several hours before, saving in a lidded glass jar. At the same time, you can cook the rice (since it takes longer than the saag) and simply reheat it before eating.

For the Saag

Ingredients

  • Orach or spinach:  two or three bunches, enough to fill a large salad bowl
  • New potatoes, a few handfuls
  • Coriander seeds
  • Fenugreek seeds
  • Mustard seeds
  • Turmeric
  • Cumin
  • 5-7 cloves of fresh garlic
  • Nub of ginger, slightly less than the size of your thumb
  • One small spring onion
  • Yogurt
  • A little cream

Instructions

  1. Boil the new potatoes in salted water until fork tender.
  2. Peel and finely chop the garlic, onion and ginger. You should have equal portions of all. They can be arranged in little piles, then combined, or just messily tossed together. I like to chop them with a meat cleaver. This takes time. Don't be tempted to do it in a food processor. They will get mushy inappropriately early. This is where you can pause overnight if need be, and save yourself the mess on the day of. They may lose pungency, but if kept in a sealed jar, they remain strong enough.
  3. Heat the butter and canola oil in tall, medium-sized saucepan (or soup pot if you are making a lot). The taller the pot the better. Add the coriander seeds, fenugreek seeds, mustard seeds, a pinch of turmeric and a pinch of cumin to the fat. Fry the spices until the seeds start to pop. Add the onions/garlic/ginger. Turn the heat down a bit and cook, stirring with a metal spatula or something else that won't be stained by the turmeric. When the onions are clearly translucent and the garlic has yet to burn, add the washed orach or spinach. Fold actively into the spice paste. Add the leaves in loads, turning the heat down now to medium-low.
  4. Cook until the leaves have broken down/incorporated with the spice paste. Turn off the heat. Add several spoonfuls of yogurt, some salt, and a trickle of cream if you have it handy. Process in a food processor if you have a vast quantity, or with a hand blender (you may want to move it to a jar if your pot isn't tall enough to prevent splatter). Chop the new potatoes and fold them in. Let the saag hang out for a while if you can, reheating it slowly before eating.

For the rice

Ingredients

  • Wild rice
  • Dried apricots
  • Tamarind

Instructions

  1. In a rice cooker or small saucepan, cook the quantity of rice appropriate for your serving of saag. For two people, about 1/2 cup of rice works well. For wild rice, use twice as much water as rice, so in this case, 1 cup.
  2. Halfway through cooking, when most of the liquid has reduced, add chopped turkish apricots and one spoonful of tamarind paste. Stir to distribute. The apricots should absorb the liquid and plump up. The tamarind adds an exciting depth of flavor.

For the fry bread

Ingredients

  • Whole wheat flour
  • White flour
  • Salt

Instructions

  1. I insist on this being as simple as possible. The idea is, you have a curry and you want something extra, delicious and filling, to scoop it up. It is not the time for your baker's hat.
  2. Take one handful of white flour and one handful of wheat flour. Mix them in a bowl with a pinch of salt or two. Add water, starting with 1/4 cup, then adding teaspoons at a time if it needs more moisture. Mix and beat around with your fists.
  3. Let rest for a hot second while you attend to some other detail of your dinner.
  4. Knead again once the glutens have activated and the dough becomes smoother and smoother. Bang out into circles. Stretch/toss like pizza, roll out or just press.
  5. Heat a cast iron (preferably a thinner one) and add a slim pour of plain oil. Take a metal spatula and scrape it across the pan 3 or 4 times to distribute the oil evenly.
  6. Gently lift and set the flatbread down in the skillet. Cook on high, watching it puff up slightly and checking the bottom for the perfect combination of browning/slight charring/softness. Flip and cook on the other side for only 30-45 seconds. Remove, immediately spread with butter (which will melt) and sprinkle on some flaky salt.

Top the saag with fried paneer

Instructions

  1. In the scheme of the meal, after the fry bread is done, everything else can easily bekept warm and/or reheated.
  2. Taking advantage of the hot cast iron (from the frying of the bread), and repeat the process with the slim glug of oil, scraping to distribute, and add square slices of paneer cheese.
  3. While the first side is frying, dish up your plates with fry bread, rice, and saag. Flip the paneer when the underside is lightly browned in an appetizing manner. Remove when the other side reaches the same color. 

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo credits Peter Schweitzer

Mushroom, Spinach & Sun-dried Tomato Bread Pudding

Savory bread pudding 2 copy.jpg

Ingredients

  • About 1 ½ oz sun-dried tomatoes (about 10-12 pieces)
  • 4 or 5 pieces of dried porcini mushrooms (not totally necessary, but really nice)
  • One yellow onion
  • 4 or 5 cloves of garlic
  • One bunch of thoroughly-washed spinach, stems trimmed
  • Two portobello mushrooms
  • 1 cup and a half of stock (mushroom, veggie, or chicken)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 pint of heavy whipping cream
  • Approx 2-3 cups of shredded gouda and/or cheddar
  • Moscatel vinegar
  • 2 natural leaven country baguettes

Directions

In a small bowl, cover the porcini mushrooms with warm water and set aside.

Melt about 1/4 of a stick of butter in a deep-rimmed pan, with a small glug of olive oil too. Peel and slice, then half-chop the onion.  Scrape them into the pan and cover with a lid so itsweats.

Warm up, make, use bouillon—whatever you needto do to get your stock ready. Once ready, Warm it on a back burner.

Chop the garlic, lift off the lid of the onions and stir the garlic in while the onions are especially moist. Lower the heat and continue to cook until they are at the partially-browned, not-quite-caramelized state. When they get there, turn off the heat and let them hang out in the pan.

Preheat the oven to 375º.

Remove the porcinis from the water and replace with sun dried tomatoes.

Heat a cast iron pan, then add the trimmed/washed/spun spinach. Using tongs, lift the spinach leaves over and over onto themselves until they go bright green and have all just barely wilted.  Set a fine mesh sieve over a metal bowl and move the spinach there. Squeeze with your hand or a spatula to encourage the excess liquid out. Leave to drip and repeat as needed.

In that same, still-warm pan, melt a pat of butter in a glug of olive oil. With the portobello mushrooms, remove the stem and slice it, then slice the top into 1/4 thick pieces. Take those pieces, stack them,and cut them in half, making slightly thinner strips. Lay these pieces in the butter and oil, toss to coat, turn up the heat and cook until the bottom sides of the mushrooms turn chestnut brown. Using tongs, flip the mushrooms and cook to the same brown on the other side. Each mushroom will fill about one pan, so remove the first batch with tongs, add more butter and oil if the pan has gone dry, and repeat.

While the mushrooms are cooking, slice the baguettes into a little less than 1/2 inch rounds. Chop them in half, then tear about half of those in half again. Pile all of them into a large mixing bowl.

In a small saucepan, heat the pint of cream over medium heat. Break the 2 eggs into a small cup and beat with a fork. When the cream is warm but not bubbling, pour some of it off into the egg mixture and continue beating. Turn the heat down to low, then add the egg/cream mixture. Stir slowly until the mixture thickens and sticks to the back of the spoon. At this stage, grate your cheese. Take a big handful of it and add it to the custard, stir to melt it in and turn off the heat.

Remove the sun-dried tomatoes from the soaking bowl and pour the tomato/porcini water into the stock pan. Chop the tomatoes and porcinis. By now the mushrooms should be finished, with a little fat left in the pan. Bring the tomatoes and porcinis over and place them briefly in the pan to absorb the fat, then move them into the pan with the onions and garlic. Squeeze out the spinach one more time, then chop it and add it to the same pan with the others. Drizzle with some some moscatel vinegar, and stir.

Pour the stock into the big mixing bowl with the prepared bread and toss so the bread soaks it up. Add the mushrooms, toss. Add the custard, toss. Crack in loads of black pepper. Toss in some flaky salt. Add the spinach, onions, garlic, tomatoes and porcinis. Add another few dribbles of moscatel vinegar. Toss. Add another big handful of cheese, toss.

Rub the end of a stick of butter around the base and edges of your circular baking dishes, then evenly distribute the bread pudding into the pans, , compacting with a spatula. Cover with the remaining cheese. Bake for about 50-55 minutes, until the cheese has gone golden on top. Serve about 20 minutes after removing from the oven.

Recipe courtesy of Andrew Barton, photo by Peter Schweitzer

 

Jerry Traunfeld’s Root Ribbons with Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, burdock, rutabagas, yams (avoid beets)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped sage
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

Instructions

Wash and peel the roots and discard the peelings. Continue to peel the vegetables from their tops to the root tips to produce ribbons, rotating the roots on their axis a quarter turn after each strip is peeled, until you're left with cores that are too small to work with. (You can snack on these or save them for stock.) Alternately, you may use a mandolin.

Melt the butter with the sage in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir for a minute to partially cook the sage. Add the root ribbons and toss them with tongs until they begin to wilt. Add the salt, a good grinding of black pepper, the maple syrup, lemon juice, and about 3/4 cup of water.

Continue to cook the vegetables over medium heat, turning them with tongs every minute or so, until all the liquid boils away and the ribbons are glazed and tender, about 10 minutes total. Serve right away, or cool and reheat in the skillet when ready to serve.

Recipe by Natalie Bickford adapted from Food52

 

Portobello Mushrooms stuffed with Root Vegetable Farro Risotto

Serves 4.

Ingredients

  • 4 large Portobello mushrooms, stems removed
  • olive oil
  • 2 large carrots, quartered length-wise and cut into ½-inch cubes
  • 2 beets, cleaned and cut into ½-inch cubes
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 cup farro, rinsed and soaked for at least 30 minutes or overnight
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • ¼ cup nutritional yeast (or parmesan)
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme or parsley
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375° F. Rub the portobello mushrooms lightly with olive oil (about 1/2 tablespoons) and place them, bowl side facing down, on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Roast for 10 minutes, to par-cook them.

Toss the carrots and beets in one tablespoon of olive oil and arrange on another parchment-lined baking sheet. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper. Place vegetables in the oven to roast. Roast the carrots and beets for about 20 minutes, or until tender with a slight crunch. 

In the meantime, heat 2 tbsp of olive oil into a medium pot over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt to the pan. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes, or until the onions are clear and soft.

Add the farro and garlic, and cook, stirring frequently, for about 2-3 minutes, or until it smells nutty. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add the white wine and continue to stir until most of the wine has been absorbed. Add 1 cup of broth and continue stirring until it has been absorbed. Continue this process, adding the stock in 1/2- to 3/4-cup amounts, until the farro is tender. Some of the grains should begin to splay open. If more liquid is needed, just use water. When the farro is ready, stir in the nutritional yeast, thyme/parsley, and lemon juice. Stir in the roasted carrots and beets (or other root vegetables). Check for seasoning and add salt and pepper to taste

Flip the mushrooms on the baking sheet so that the bowl side faces up. Fill each cap with a heaping 1/2 cup (or so) of risotto. Top with a sprinkle of parmesan, if you’d like.  Transfer the mushrooms to the oven and bake for 10 minutes. Serve and enjoy.

Recipe by Natalie BickfordRecipe adapted from Food52.